2014 Open Show – judge Mr C Hill (Scalene)

MPD   1 Karaszy’s Falco Peregrinus at Silvestre, 2 Reidolvalley What a Card, 3 Topaeris Master Blaster

PD       1 Reidolvalley What a Card, 2 Artilysminiz Wisteria, 3 Silvestre Blazing Saddles

JD – no entries

YD       1 Hubertus Hungaricum Adal at Pitswarren (ImpHun), 2 Bournehouse Crispin, 3 Lutra Lord Admiral by Arunszvar

PGD    1 Zahur Zambala, 2 Broadsedge Dream Lover

LD       1 Parcroft Piros by Arunszvar, 2 Daxpack Court Case

OD      1 Bitcon Skymaster with Silvestre ShCM, 2 Hookside Gabor, 3 Bournehouse Hawkeye to Bequerelle, 4 ShCh Duncarreg Alesandro Del Pirospont JW

VD      1 ShCh Bequerelle Cooper Creek JW ShCM, 2 Vizslanya Rebusz at Pirospont ShCM

FTD    1 Hookside Gergo

MPB   1 Alsziv Laurona, 2 Nicael Miss Ginger Rogers

PB       1 Kincsem Pussy Galore

JB       1 Daxpack Lush Lashes, 2 Carnlochan Sirocco

YB       1 Nicael Lola, 2 Topaeris Summer Love, 3 Alfizsbet The One And Only, 4 Karrouki Windflower, 5 B’Ignis Brunensis Locura at Aldom

PGB    1 Afanleigh Sophie at Perllanside, 2 Glaslleb Skyfall, 3 Nicael Rochella at Alsziv, 4 Karrouki Windrush D’Lyla JW, 5 Kincsem Emma Llatsew

LB       1 Gingibre Head Over Heels, 2 Helsim Over The Rainbow, 3 Kincsem Pretty Picture, 4 Ranchstar Alice Tinker, 5 Silvestre Click My Heels with Carnlochan

OB      1 ShCh Carwci’s Phoenix ShCM, 2 ShCh Pitswarren denim Genes JW, 3 Kincsem Libby at Topaeris, 4 Nicael Flora, 5 Silvestre Shake Yr Booty

VB       1 Aldom Cristal, 2 Szajani Komika, 3 Shelseivad Gingers Gift to Silvestre, 4 Bequerelle Pinaroo, 5 Ranchstar Miranda Hobbes

FTB    1 Daxpack Thornbird, 2 Szajani Komika

Ch Stakes D or B

1 Sh Ch Carwci’s Phoenix ShCm, 2 Salvache Hidden Glory to Bequerelle JW

Brace  1 Mrs S & Mr NS Mills, 2 Mr G & Mrs CA Sutherland, 3 Mr TD & Mrs AM White

John Wagstaff Special Working Memorial D or B

1 Zavis Rhapsody, 2 Karrouki Windrush D’Lyla JW, 3 Hookside Gabor, 4 Parcroft Piros by Arunszvar

 

BD      Hubertus Hungaricum Adal at Pitswarren (imp.hun)

RBD    ShCh Bequerelle Coopers Creek JW ShCM

bpd      Karaszy’s Falco Peregrinus at Silvestre

 

bb        Zavis Rhapsody

rbb      Nicael Lola

bpb      Kincsem Pussy Galore

Results of the HVC Open Show held on 16th March 2014

BIS

Best in Show:White’s Parcroft Piros by Arunszvar
Reserve Best in Show:Connolly’s Bitcon Celebrity

 

bpis

Best Puppy in Show:Da Silva’s Bournehouse Crispin
Reserve Best Puppy in Show: Rutherford & Westall’s Kincsem Enna Llatsew
Congratulations to all the winners!

All the results can be found here

 

Results of 2015 Open show

MPD   1 Karaszy’s Falco Peregrinus at Silvestre, 2 Reidolvalley What a Card, 3 Topaeris Master Blaster

PD       1 Reidolvalley What a Card, 2 Artilysminiz Wisteria, 3 Silvestre Blazing Saddles

JD – no entries

YD       1 Hubertus Hungaricum Adal at Pitswarren (ImpHun), 2 Bournehouse Crispin, 3 Lutra Lord Admiral by Arunszvar

PGD    1 Zahur Zambala, 2 Broadsedge Dream Lover

LD       1 Parcroft Piros by Arunszvar, 2 Daxpack Court Case

OD      1 Bitcon Skymaster with Silvestre ShCM, 2 Hookside Gabor, 3 Bournehouse Hawkeye to Bequerelle, 4 ShCh Duncarreg Alesandro Del Pirospont JW

VD      1 ShCh Bequerelle Cooper Creek JW ShCM, 2 Vizslanya Rebusz at Pirospont ShCM

FTD    1 Hookside Gergo

MPB   1 Alsziv Laurona, 2 Nicael Miss Ginger Rogers

PB       1 Kincsem Pussy Galore

JB       1 Daxpack Lush Lashes, 2 Carnlochan Sirocco

YB       1 Nicael Lola, 2 Topaeris Summer Love, 3 Alfizsbet The One And Only, 4 Karrouki Windflower, 5 B’Ignis Brunensis Locura at Aldom

PGB    1 Afanleigh Sophie at Perllanside, 2 Glaslleb Skyfall, 3 Nicael Rochella at Alsziv, 4 Karrouki Windrush D’Lyla JW, 5 Kincsem Emma Llatsew

LB       1 Gingibre Head Over Heels, 2 Helsim Over The Rainbow, 3 Kincsem Pretty Picture, 4 Ranchstar Alice Tinker, 5 Silvestre Click My Heels with Carnlochan

OB      1 ShCh Carwci’s Phoenix ShCM, 2 ShCh Pitswarren denim Genes JW, 3 Kincsem Libby at Topaeris, 4 Nicael Flora, 5 Silvestre Shake Yr Booty

VB       1 Aldom Cristal, 2 Szajani Komika, 3 Shelseivad Gingers Gift to Silvestre, 4 Bequerelle Pinaroo, 5 Ranchstar Miranda Hobbes

FTB    1 Daxpack Thornbird, 2 Szajani Komika

Ch Stakes D or B

1 Sh Ch Carwci’s Phoenix ShCm, 2 Salvache Hidden Glory to Bequerelle JW

Brace  1 Mrs S & Mr NS Mills, 2 Mr G & Mrs CA Sutherland, 3 Mr TD & Mrs AM White

John Wagstaff Special Working Memorial D or B

1 Zavis Rhapsody, 2 Karrouki Windrush D’Lyla JW, 3 Hookside Gabor, 4 Parcroft Piros by Arunszvar

 

BD      Hubertus Hungaricum Adal at Pitswarren (imp.hun)

RBD    ShCh Bequerelle Coopers Creek JW ShCM

bpd      Karaszy’s Falco Peregrinus at Silvestre

 

bb        Zavis Rhapsody

rbb      Nicael Lola

bpb      Kincsem Pussy Galore

Training Days

WATER TRAINING DAY 18 MAY 2014
With Allan Hender in West Berkshire

The HVC held a water training day with Allan Hender in West Berkshire, the weather was kind to us and it did not rain until the very end of the training. Unfortunately the original water training area was not available to us and we therefore trained at the West Berkshire Gundog Club training ground which has a fast flowing river and to ensure that there was not too much hanging around we also done some general training.
Arron Busby came along to photograph the day.

We met at 10am at which time Allan ran through the various disciplines that he had prepared for us. The idea was that folk went to whatever activity they wanted rather than going in groups.

In the morning there were water retrieves which could be challenging as the river does have a fast flow, however, downriver there was a trusty dog to retrieve any dummies not retrieved by the dog training. Some dogs retrieved from the bank on the other side of the river and some went in a river and swam for the first time.

On land there was a rabbit bungee, this required the dog to be sent out for a seen retrieve and on the dogs return to the handler about 6 feet to the side of them a rabbit bungee was let off with the hope that the dog would ignore this and carry on with the return to hand. Ha Ha some dogs decided that the rabbit looked far more fun and tried desperately to get it.

There was a retrieve from a pen and with the dog sitting some distance away and the dummy was thrown into the pen and the dog then sent to retrieve it, something a bit different and as most folk do not have access to a pen it was very a useful exercise.

Further down the field a dummy launcher was being used for longer retrieves and was again good practice for those dogs who get over excited at the sound of the launcher.

Allan was taking the hunting and we had a fabulous wind blowing just right to encourage hunting and to see the dogs natural ability.

At lunch break the HVC provided cakes and soft drinks

In the afternoon the dogs could do a water retrieve from a different entry on the river.

Neil was giving tuition in getting your dog to deliver the dummy to hand and those who took advantage of this found his suggestions very useful.

The day ended with some exhausted dogs (and handlers) and hopefully everyone gained something from the day.

Thank you all who took part and thank you for your support.

Training Day – 2nd June 2013
at the Drummond Estate, Enderby, Leicestershire by kind permission of
Mr Fred Drummond and his gamekeeper Brian Griffiths

The weather had been kind to us – no rain, some sunshine and a light breeze ideal for hunting. We had 9 dogs attending (5 Vizslas, 3 Weimaraners, 1 Cocker Spaniel) and started the day at 10am with some basic obedience training. We worked our way up until all dogs present where shot over.

We also had some spectators and a family attending who are waiting for their Vizsla puppy to be born.

Everybody enjoyed their day and came away feeling a lot more positive about what they can achieve with their dogs. They were all presented with a Certificate, Rosette and HVC trolley token keyring.

Unfortunately we were not able to hold a raffle on the day but I wanted to give a special mention to Susan Northwood who very kindly sent a cheque for £15.00 towards raffle prizes. Susan attended the first training days we held in 2011. She learnt so much on these days and has entered many working tests with her Hookside Gabor (Rudi) since.

Shot Over Day 21st January 2012
Following on from the successful training days held in March and April 2011, the Draycott family (owners of the Tooley Park shoot) offered the ground for a shot over day towards the end of the season. This took place on 21st January and was attended by 6 novice dogs and handlers. I was generously assisted by Penny Simpson and the guns on the day were Peter & Andrew Draycott, Mark Hill who owns the adjoining farm who also made ground available to us on the day and Nick Hart who handles the financial side of the shoot.

We began the day with a walk through a cover crop of mustard; each dog was run individually to assess obedience and steadiness in an area where we did not expect to find too many birds. We then took a long walk via hedgerows and ditches to one of the larger spinnies where all the dogs were run as a beating line, several birds were shot and retrieved. After lunch we boarded the shoot bus to Mark Hill’s farm and worked the dogs through maize and a spinney. At the end of the day all had at least 2 retrieves ad everyone had been given an insight into working their dogs on live game under gun fire and hopefully now have the confidence to join a shoot local to themselves and enjoy and fulfil their dog’s abilities.

I am also grateful for the assistance on the day of Jim Novis and Simone who brought 2 experienced Vizsla bitches in case any wounded birds proved too difficult for the novices, in the event they were not really needed.

HVC Training Days – 27 March & 9 April 2011
The HVC recently held 2 training days for novice handlers as an introduction into working their Vizslas on a shoot, working test or field trial. 12 Vizslas and their handlers attended either one or both days and hopefully all have learnt something and more importantly enjoyed the days.

Both days were held on Tooley Park Shoot in Leicestershire and a special thanks should be given to the owners, the Draycott family, for allowing us free range over the shoot and the use of the shoot’s lunch hut for refreshments.

The trainers were Penny Simpson, well known in Vizsla circles, Geoff Thompson, a very experienced handler and respected in GSP circles and Derek Whitfield, Acting HVC Field Trial Secretary.

The weather on both days has been extremely kind to us, especially on the 2nd day when we had glorious sunshine all day.

We started both days with a demonstration by Geoff Thompson and his 10 months old GSP, Max. All those present were astounded by his ability to stop at distance on the whistle and his prowess on retrieving both seen and blind dummies.

After this we were split into 3 groups with Penny teaching hunting, Geoff teaching retrieving and Derek teaching basic obedience and also explaining the working of the shoot and how we beat with our dogs through woodland. Some handlers were treated to a visit to one of the laying pens holding some of the more exotic pheasants.

The trainers felt that all of the dogs had some degree of ability and felt they could all progress and be a credit to their owners so hopefully this will just be a start to their working careers.

Also thanks to Queenie Whitfield for providing some delicious cup cakes.

A total of £435.00 has been raised for the Polymyositis Fund.

Agility league

UK HUNGARIAN VIZSLA AGILITY LEAGUE

 

Background Information

 The concept of canine agility began in the UK in 1977 and quickly spread throughout the world. It is currently one of Britain’s fastest growing dog sports with training classes and competitions being held across the country.

The aims of dog agility are very similar to show jumping – the dogs (with the help of their handler’s voice, movement and hand/body signals) have to complete a course of between 16 and 20 obstacles in the right numerical order, without any faults and in the fastest possible time. The best words the agility team can hear on completing a course are “clear round” meaning no faults!

The obstacles include:

 

  • Different types of jump i.e. “winged” jumps, walls, spreads, tyres

IAN_9034

  • Tunnels i.e. open and collapsible…dogs LOVE the tunnels!
  • HVC (1)
  • Weave poles – here the dog is required to “weave” its way through a series of closely spaced poles (up to a maximum of 12 poles). This is without doubt the most difficult piece of equipment for the dogs to learn but, once they have mastered it, is the most spectacular to watch!

HVC weaves

  • “Contact” obstacles i.e. the A-frame, dog-walk and see-saw. These are obstacles that the dog has to run over while ensuring that they “touch the contact points” (painted a different colour) at the beginning and end of the piece of equipment.

HVC - A-frame

At training classes the dogs often learn with the help of toys or treats…but…when it comes to competitions these incentives are not allowed, nor is the handler allowed to touch the dog during the running of the competition course!

 

But…you don’t have to compete…there are many owners who are happy to attend weekly classes for the overall training that it offers, socialisation (of dog and human), bond building with your four-legged charge and helping to keep both owners and dogs fit. Even better – agility training exercises the brain too…for both of you!

So, hopefully, you can see that dog agility is a fun sport that helps to build a true partnership between dog and human.

 

Before Starting Agility Training

The following is essential before beginning agility training:

 

  • The dog must be at least 6 months old before they can begin “puppy agility training” or, as it’s often called, “foundation training”
  • The dog must be fit and healthy
  • The dog needs to be able to “sit”, “stay” (or “wait”) and “come” i.e. basic obedience

 

The “UK Hungarian Vizsla Agility League”

In June 2012 the UK Hungarian Vizsla Agility League (UKHVAL) was formed so that those who love to do agility with their ginger boys and girls could get recognition without competing against other breeds. We decided to set up a Facebook group for the following reasons:

 

  • So that achievements could be recognised and celebrated instantly
  • As a resource for those wanting help, advice, tips etc. The league the ideal place to get help and advice on all aspects of agility – from tips on how to deal with particular pieces of equipment to how to start out in the competition world
  • A place where photographs and videos could be shared and stored

 

Rules of the UK Hungarian Vizsla Agility League

The league will run from 1st January to 31st December each year and is based on a points system (see below). New members that join later in the year will have their points backdated.

The league is run on an honesty basis.

The administrators for the league are Rachel Shergold, Sue Roberton, Juliet Bailiff and Lindsay Thomason

At present there is no annual fee to join this league. We seek sponsorship for rosettes and end of year awards.

 

All UK based owners of Hungarian Vizslas are welcome to join this league. We will accept HV Crosses as members of the Facebook Group but they will NOT be able to compete within the league nor will they be able to compete at our annual agility day (though NFC runs will be accepted). To compete in the league dogs must be:

 

  • A minimum of 16 months old – for Steeplechase courses only
  • A minimum of 18 months old for all courses i.e. Agility, Jumping and Steeplechase
  • Veterans (over 7 years of age on 1st January of the competing year) will compete in the main league – if we find that there are a “reasonable” number of veterans still competing we will look to have a separate competing group

 

When registering we ask that the following information be provided so that we have both the handler/owner and the dog(s) full details:

  • Owner/handler name
  • Owner/handler email address
  • Owner/handler Facebook name
  • HV “Pet” and KC name(s)
  • HV date(s) of birth
  • Owner/handler KC and UKA running grades The Vizsla will remain in the grade that they start the year in – the owner is responsible for changing the grade at the beginning of every New Year. The grading will be based on the KC format so the gradings for the league are as follows:
    UK Hungarian Vizsla League Grades Kennel Club
    Group 1 Grades 1
    Group 2 Grades 2 and 3
    Group 3 Grades 4 and above

    This league is all about the dogs therefore if someone else handles the dog (for whatever reason) points may still be claimed.

    Points can only be claimed for the following shows:

     

    • Kennel Club Open or Limited
    • Unaffiliated shows i.e. UKA, EMDAC and ABAA

     

    Points CANNOT be claimed from invitational events, leagues, single breed only and inter-club shows.

    In order that the league is fair for everyone, including newly competing members, points may only be claimed for the following classes:

     

    • Agility
    • Jumping
    • Steeplechase

    Points can only be claimed if a “position” rosette is presented by the show (i.e. 1st, 2nd, 3rd etc), otherwise clear round points must be claimed. Clear round points can be claimed for Clear Rounds within course time even if no clear round rosette is awarded by the show.

     

    When claiming points we ask that you return the Excel Monthly Results Submission spreadsheet during the first week of each month. A copy of this spreadsheet will be provided for all members and is also available to download from the “Files” section on the groups Facebook page.

    We will provide league tables on a monthly basis.

    Rosettes will be awarded to all league participants at year end according to their Group and position within that Group. In addition, there are five end of year special prizes that are awarded by the administrators. These prize categories are:

    • Clear Rounds
    • Places (1st to 5th)
    • Veteran (over 7 years on 1st January of the relevant year)
      • Young Competing Dog/Bitch (under 3 years on 1st January of the relevant year)
      • Puppy Prize (under 2 years on 1st January of the relevant year). This is a photo/video competition and is aimed at those members who do not yet compete but are just starting out in the agility world

    SO IF YOU WANT TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS AND LEARN EVEN MORE ABOUT THIS FANTASTIC, FUN SPORT…PLEASE JOIN US!

     

    The UKHVAL has gone from strength to strength since its inception in 2012 and currently comprises over 130 members (with more waiting in the wings!). We’re an eclectic mix of individuals – from the very experienced to those who are just considering starting out in the agility world…and everything in between! When you join us you’ll find that we’re a dedicated and caring group of people who just want the best for our Vizslas. We believe that agility is an ideal way of providing that all important mental and physical stimulation that our precious breed thrive on – we would encourage anyone that is lucky enough to be owned by (!) these multi-talented Hungarian Vizslas to consider starting this excellent form of training.

    WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING YOU ON FACEBOOK!

     

Agility

Agility was first introduced to the UK at Crufts 1978 and the structure of the competition has not changed very much over the years. It’s a comparatively new form of dog competition, where the animal’s fitness and the handler’s ability to train and direct the dog over and through certain obstacles are tested.

It is fast, furious and a great favourite with competitors and spectators alike. Your dog does not have to be a pedigree dog to take part, but it must be registered with the Kennel Club on either the Breed Register or the Activity Register.

If you decide that Agility is a suitable activity for you and your dog, your next step is to receive some expert training. Whatever competition you choose, your dog will be a happier pet for being trained.

Once you start competing in agility it can become addictive. Shows are held all over the country for each Grade and height, giving you the opportunity to compete regularly and meet likeminded people.
As you enter different shows you might find yourself bumping into the same competitors and making good friends with the people who take part in this sociable hobby.

The formal requirements for competing in a Kennel Club licensed Agility show are quite simple:

Your dog must be registered with the Kennel Club, either on the Breed Register or on the Activity Register.

Competitors taking part in any Kennel Club licensed event must familiarise themselves with the Kennel Club Rules and Regulations beforehand. The Agility Regulations can be found in the Agility and Flyball Regulations booklet.

Dogs can only enter Agility shows when they are 18 months of age or over and have been officially measured and placed in the correct height category.
You will need to have an Agility Record Book (available from the Kennel Club online shop) in which to record your dog’s height category and all your competition wins and clear rounds.

Training
Preparing your dog to be able to compete successfully will take a little longer than the formal requirements. It is essential that your dog is fully socialised and that you have effective control at all times, especially as your dog will be competing off-lead. For safety’s sake it is recommended that dogs do not start training on equipment until they are at least a year old.

Plenty of regular practice is essential preparation for Agility competitions, but supervised training at an Agility class is just as important. There are a number of training clubs across the country.

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Poisons

Algae (Blue Green)
Seen on lakes and ponds in summer- highly toxic –fatalities recorded.

Azalea or Rhododendron
Gastric upset-dog may salivate excessively, become weak, in extreme cases depression of central nervous system, heart failure and coma if treatment delayed. Principal toxin:- Grayantoxin.

Asparagus Fern
Can affect heart, kidneys and liver. Can cause vomiting and abdominal pain. Sometimes a tremor can be seen affecting head body and limbs.

Amaryllis
Gastric upset – vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain. Central Nervous System depression causing lethargy. Excessive salivation tremors loss of appetite, without treatment dog may go into shock, coma.
Principal toxin: – Lycorine.

Autumn Crocus
Gastric upset- bloody vomiting, diarrhoea, depression of Central Nervous System dog maybe hyperactive then lethargic. Can suppress bone marrow. Multi organ damage. If left untreated can result in coma and death.
Principal toxin- Colchicine

Apple Leaves & Stem
If enough ingested signs are inflammation of mouth in particular the gums. Rapid breathing and dilated pupils. If untreated the dog may go into shock.

American Yew & Western Yew
Causes abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea
(See English Yew)

Apricot Seeds
Vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain.

Avocado
Affects stomach causing vomiting and diarrhoea, breathing may be rapid and laboured, can accumulate round heart. Can cause death.
Principle toxin- Persin

Aloe Vera
If consumed in large quantities will cause diarrhoea, vomiting, loss of appetite, depression, tremors and change colour of urine.
Principle toxin- Saponins

Apple Leaf Croton
Can cause liver and kidney failure due to toxin contained in the plant. Severe gastric irritation especially the lining of the bowel – can cause ruptures in the bowel due to inflammation. The heart can be affected due to bleeding into its tissues. Can prove fatal.
Principle toxin- Ricin.

Angels Trumpets
Vomiting and diarrhoea.

Acorns
Varied effect on dogs if eaten in quantities.

Almond
Vomiting and diarrhoea & abdominal pain

Bleeding Heart (Dicentra Spectabilis)
Needs fairly large quantities to be poisonous however the plant can cause dermatitis and contains a substance that can cause the dog to fit.
Toxic component- Isoquinoline.

Buttercup
Vomiting & diarrhoea

Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia Gillesii)
Diarrhoea, vomiting and loss of coordination.
Principal Toxin- Hydrocyanic Acid.

Blue Bell
Poisonous if large quantities eaten.

Bella Donna (Deadly Nightshade)
Excessive salivation, severe diarrhoea and vomiting, depression of the Central Nervous System, drowsy, confused, weak, dilated pupils and slow heart rate.
Principal Toxins- Salanine & Saponis.

Cotoneaster
Excessive salivation, vomiting & diarrhoea. Berries are of low toxicity but with all poisons its how much is digested and size of dog.

Conkers (Horse Chestnut)
If eaten whole may cause obstruction. Signs of gut obstruction- Abdominal tenderness, unsteady gait, refuses to eat & salivation all may appear within a few hours of swallowing conker.

Christmas Cherry (Solanium)
Low toxicity- but can cause diarrhoea and vomiting.

Calla Lily (Zantedexhia Aethiopiea)
Causes irritation in the mouth and intense burning, diarrhoea & vomiting, difficulty in swallowing, tremors may be seen with loss of balance; in some cases it can prove fatal.
Principal Toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Caladium
As for Calla Lily above.

Clematis
Diarrhoea & vomiting, Central Nervous System can be affected by plant toxins. May become confused; mouth ulcers maybe present.
Principal Toxin- Protoanemonin

Cuban Laurel
Diarrhoea & vomiting.

Christmas Rose (Helleborus Niger)
Diarrhoea which may be bloody & vomiting, dog can become disorientated and confused; may have seizures.
Principal Toxin- Veratrin

Cyclamen
Diarrhoea & vomiting, can cause dermatitis. There have been some fatalities.
Highest concentration of toxins at root level.
Principle Toxin- Cyclamide.

Cherry (Stems & Leaves)
Gums can become very inflamed, pupils may be dilated, signs of shock maybe apparent, breathing may be rapid.

Daffodil (Flower & Bulbs)
Diarrhoea & vomiting, weakness may have seizures. 15g of bulbs can be fatal. Heart can be affected and Central Nervous System depressed; may have excessive salivation.

Daphne
Diarrhoea & vomiting, toxins may affect kidneys can also cause dermatitis.
Principal Toxin- Coumarin Glycosides.

Dumb Cane (Dieffenbachia)
Will cause intense irritation in the mouth; can cause asphyxiation if mouth & throat swell, other symptoms may be seizures, muscle weakness, loss of coordination; ultimately death if large quantities ingested and go untreated.
Principal Toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Dutchman’s Britches (Dicentra)
Can cause dermatitis, is poisonous in large amounts, contains a convulsant.
Principal Toxin- Isoquinoline.

Devils Ivy (Epipremnum Aureum)
Diarrhoea & vomiting, causes irritation to mouth and throat – burning sensation and inflammation. Excessive salivation. Tremors maybe present with seizures. Asphyxiation may happen if swelling of throat severe.
Principal Toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Elephants Ears (Caladium Hortulanum)
Causes Irritation in the mouth, excessive salavation, burning and possible swelling of tongue and throat. If this happens real possibility of death through asphyxia
Principal Toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Easter Lily(Lilium Longiflorum)
Diarrhoea & Vomiting, Weakness and possibly kidney failure.
Toxin- Unknown

English Ivy (Hedera Helix)
Diarrhoea & Vomiting, may present with fever and thirst the breathing maybe laboured, pupils maybe dilated. There maybe excessive salivation and they may appear weak and uncoordinated.
Principal Toxin- Hederagenin.

English Yew
The dog may appear uncoordinated have a dry mouth and dilated pupils (mydriasis) within 1 hour of ingestion. May have abdominal pain and salavation with vomiting. The leaves are more toxic than the berries.
Death can be very sudden and without symptoms.

Egg Plant
Diarrhoea & vomiting, may appear lethargic. Can present with heart failure.

Elderberry (Sambucus Canadensis)
Diarrhoea & vomiting. Plant may contain toxic levels of Nitrates.

Ergot (Claviceps Purpurea)
Reacts on the muscle of the uterus- therefore if eaten can cause abortion if bitch in whelp

Foxglove (Digitalis Purpurea)
Diarrhoea & vomiting, may cause loss of balance and tremors eventually if left untreated; collapse due to heart failure and death if left untreated.
Principal Toxin- Cardiac Glycosides.

Fiddle Leaf Fig (Fiscus Lyrata)
Diarrhoea & vomiting may cause dermatitis or skin irritation.

Fungus
Depends on type for reaction. Always take sample of others growing nearby if you saw dog eating them. So they can be identified.

Giant Burdock (Artium Lappa)
The burrs get stuck to the coat of the animal – they have hooks on them and penetrate the tongue as the dog tries to lick them off. Can penetrate the lining of the mouth. Causes extreme discomfort & Irritation. We should always remove if on coat.
The discomfort produces excessive salavation.

German Primula
Can cause nausea and vomiting, irritation to skin.

Holly Berries
Quick onset of symptoms within 3 hours of ingestion. Salavation, vomiting loss of balance and tremors possible seizures.

Heavenly Bamboo (Nandina Domestica)
Vomiting Diarrhoea, pale mucous membranes in mouth may have cyanosis (blue tinge) present, seizures, may have lung congestion going on to respiratory failure, semi coma; fatal if not treated.
Principal Toxin- Cyanogenic Glycosides.

Honeysuckle
Diarrhoea & vomiting; animal becomes lethargic.

Hydrangea (Hydrangea Macrophylla)
Vomiting & depression of Central Nervous System, increase in heart rate and temperature, can suffer loss of balance and loss of appetite.
Principle Toxin- Cyanogenic Glycosides.

Hyacinth (Hyacinthus Orientalis)
Intense vomiting & diarrhoea which may have blood in it. Lethargy and tremors.
Principal Toxin- Possibly strong Alkaloids.

Iris
Vomiting & Diarrhoea both of which may have blood in them. Excessive salivation and abdominal pain.

Jerusalem Cherry (Solanum Psudocapsicum)
Can cause dermatitis, severe diarrhoea & vomiting can cause ulceration of stomach and bowel, may have seizures and go into shock.
Principal Toxins- Solanine, nitrates.

Jimsons Weed ( Datura Stramonium)
Can cause dermatitis, sight maybe affected, confusion and abnormal thirst.
Principle Toxin- Strong alkaloids.

Jonquil/Narcissus
Vomiting & diarrhoea animal can be lethargic or hyperactive, may appear weak with tremors and seizures the heart can be affected producing irregular rhythms; if left untreated can be fatal.
Principal Toxins- Narcissine, Narcipoeitin, Lycorineh.

Jasmine
Can cause respiratory failure weakness and seizures can occur.

Jack in the Pulpit (Arisaema supp)
Causes burning in the mouth; can also be hallucinogenic.
Principal Toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Kalanchoe
Causes gastrointestinal irritation, affects the heart rate and rhythm due to its toxins.
Principal toxin- Bufodienalidis.

Lily of the Valley (Convallaria Majalis)
Gastric upset; dog may also appear confused due to strong glycosides in plant – will affect the rhythm of the heart and can be fatal.
Principal Toxins- Convallarin & Convallatoxin.

Leyland Cypress
At worst skin irritation.

Larkspur
Gastric upset, dog may appear nervous, heart can be affected by alkaloids in plant. Can cause dermatitis.

Mistletoe ( Phoradendron Spp)
Leaves & stems carry the most toxins however a few berries can prove fatal to a puppy. Has hallucinogenic properties. Affects the heart and lungs by slowing the systems down.
Principal Toxins- Toxalbumin, Pharatoxin,Viscumin.

Morning Glory (Ipomoea Spp)
Can cause diarrhoea, seeds can cause hallucinations.
Principal Toxin- Lysergic Acid.

Oleander (Nerium Oleander)
Diarrhoea & Vomiting, can lethargic or very excitable, the heart can be affected by powerful glycosides in the plant. Body temperature can drop and be fatal can also cause dermatitis.
Principal Toxins- Cardiac Glycosides, Nerioside, Oleandroside, Oleandrin.

Pytracantha- Rowan or Mountain Ash.
Vomiting Diarrhoea and excessive salavation.

Poinsettia
May cause diarrhoea & vomiting. Abdominal pain. If sap gets into eyes it is an irritant. (Irrigate with water- but still seek veterinary help as soon as possible)
Can cause confusion.
Principle Toxin- Euphorbin.

Philodendron
Types:- Horse Head & Heartleaf
Saddle Leaf, Lacy Tree, Split Leaf.
All cause diarrhoea and burning sensation in the mouth. Can cause dermatitis if touched.
Principle Toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)
Vomiting, excessive salavation intense burning to mouth lips and tongue. Difficulty in swallowing. If throat very inflamed- then can asphyxiate.
Principle toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Peach Stones
Contain cyanide -harmful if eaten in quantities.

Peony
Vomiting & diarrhoea. Loss of balance, tremors and seizures. Dog may appear lethargic. Heart failure with collapse may happen and could be fatal.

Panda
As for Philodendron.

Plumosa Fern or Asparagus Fern ( Asparagus Plumosus)
Can cause dermatitis. If berries eaten can cause vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain.

Primrose
Vomiting.

Ragwort (Senecio Jacoboea)
This plant is reportable to DEFRA as it is extremely toxic to animals. Several dogs die every year by accidental ingestion of some of the plant when grazing grass or other herbs. Causes kidney failure and liver damage – both are irreversible. Small doses can be fatal as the plant contains very toxic alkaloids.
If you come across any they should be dug up and taken away and destroyed- do not leave them on the ground as when dry the toxins are stronger and grazing animals are more likely to ingest them. Humans are affected if the plant is eaten – it causes hepatic(liver) disease.

Rhododendron
Vomiting, diarrhoea excessive salavation, weakness, low blood pressure, coma. Can cause cardiac collapse and death.
Principal Toxin- Grayantoxin.

Sago Palm (Cycas Revoluta)
All parts are poisonous- but seeds & nuts contain most toxins. 1-2 seeds eaten can cause serious problems. Diarrhoea, vomiting, depression of Central Nervous System. Can cause liver failure and seizures.
Principle Toxin- Cycasin.

Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera Deliciosa)
If cuttings taken the sap or water they were in if drunk will cause diarrhoea and vomiting. Causes intense irritation to mouth, tongue and throat and if inflammation present then breathing may be difficult.
Principal toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Stinging Nettles & Spider Mum
Both cause urticaria if touched and can cause dermatitis.

Tomato Plants ( Lycopersicon Spp)
Excessive salivation, loss of appetite, severe diarrhoea and vomiting. Dog may appear drowsy and confused. Behaviour may change. Pupils maybe dilated heart rate slow and dog may appear weak.
Principal toxin- Solanine.

Tulip
Intense vomiting & diarrhoea, loss of appetite, excessive salivation. Similar to daffodils.

Taro Vine (Scindapsus Aureus)
Diarrhoea & vomiting. Causes intense burning to mouth lips and tongue. Difficulty in swallowing. Caution needed if throat swells.
Principal toxin- Calcium Oxalate Crystals.

Umbrella Plant
Vomiting & diarrhoea,abdominal cramps. Can cause heart, lung and kidney problems. Tremors maybe seen.

Wild Cherry
Diarrhoea & vomiting, rapid breathing or gasping may be seen. May collapse due to release of cyanide held in one of its compounds.

Yucca
Diarrhoea & vomiting. Excessive salavation and seizures.

Chocolate & Raisins are both very toxic to dogs – especially Raisins- fatalities have occurred with both.

All the above are for guides only as to which plants or substance are poisonous there are many more. If you suspect a pup or dog has ingested some of the plants, you should contact your vet for advice and if possible always take a sample of the plant etc for identification. Also try and ascertain how much has been eaten. It can hasten treatment if the vet knows the name of the plant as he will have access to a full poisons list. If you know of any more please let me know and I will add them to the list.

Sue Millson
KC Breed Health Coordinator.
sue@lutra.me.uk

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is relatively common in dogs. It only affects uncastrated males. It is seen more in older dogs but can affect dogs of any age. Testicular cancer is usually benign in dogs ( chances of metastasis between 5-15% -depending on the kind of cancer present.)

There are 3 kinds of testicular cancer – Sertoli cell, Seminoma and Intestitial cell. The treatment for all is identical – castration. Although cancers are unlikely to spread they do carry problems so should be removed – the testicle may swell (considerably in some cases) & cause discomfort or it may secrete female hormones and cause feminisation – hair loss, enlarged nipples, weight gain.

Cryptorchid males (those without 2 fully descended testicles in the scrotum) are more likely to develop testicular cancer and should be castrated as a routine befoe the age of 3-4yrs.The retained testicle(s) are 13 times more likely to develop cancer. It is too warm for testicles in or next to the body – they like to be a few degrees cooler in the scrotum. Cryptochid males should never be used for breeding as it is considered an inherited trait. I am not aware of cryptorchidism being a significant problem in the Vizsla.

Entire males should have their testicles routinely checked – just have a gentle feel around – they should be approximately even sized and a firm texture. In most testicles the knobbly vas deferens can be easily felt and is often mistaken for a lump – just have a good feel of the other one & if both are the same there is unlikely to be an abnormality. Sometimes the lump cannot be felt but you may notice the signs of feminisation – in which case seek the advise of your vet. Some entire males with prostate or anal gland problems may have excess testosterone which could be caused by neoplasia. Most vets will routinely check well behaved entire males during vaccination or clinical examinations – if you have any doubt just ask them have a feel!!

Testicular tumours are easily prevented through routine castration (I know – not a very popular suggestion to most breeders.) Dogs that are no longer used for breeding could be castrated and there are other advantages of castrating dogs that are never going to be used for breeding. (No testicular cancer and a massive reduction in the incidence of prostate problems, perineal hernias, anal adenomas and anal gland problems.)

Just remember to include a quick feel around the scrotum when checking your older boys.

Emma Faulkner BVetMed MRCVS

Immune mediated illnesses

See this page for more detail

Immune mediated diseases are not uncommon in the vizsla and the HVC asks all owners to report instances so that the conditions can continue to be monitored.This is important for the future health and well being of the breed.

The auto immune/immune mediated  illnesses that are described on the vizsla health website have all been known to present in the breed –  with an especial frequency for  atopy/allergies/intolerances, Polymyositis, Sebaceous Adenitis, Polyarthritis and Steroid Responsive Meningitis/Arteritis. Immune Mediated Haemolytic Anaemia and Thrombocytopaenia also seem to be over represented.

A breed specific presentation of Vizsla Polymyositis has only recently been recognised and there is more information here

Autoimmune disease is multi-factorial, meaning several things must happen for an individual to become ill. A trigger is always required and this is something that is also being investigated

If your vizsla suffers from an immune related disorder please complete this online questionnaire in respect of ALL vizslas that you know to have had a problem. The further back in time that we can go then the more useful the information will be

It is vital for the future wellbeing of the Hungarian Vizsla that people are honest and forthcoming. Please help if you can. Everybody has a chance to make a difference. Even  tiny bits of information will contribute to the biggest understanding of how we might help our vizslas stay healthy.

Confidentiality is assured. Please make contact if advice is needed

This survey in to immune mediated disease is separate from and additional to the general health surveys conducted by Sue Millson – our breed health coordinator

See this page for more detail

Hip Dysplasia

Hip Dysplasia is an inherited orthopaedic problem of dogs and a wide number of other mammals. Abnormal development of the structures that make up the hip joint leads to subsequent joint deformity. ‘Dysplasia’ means abnormal growth. The developmental changes appear first and because they are related to growth, they are termed primary changes. Subsequently these changes may lead to excessive wear and tear. The secondary changes may be referred to as (osteo)arthritis (OA), (osteo)arthrosis or degenerative joint disease (DJD). Later one or both hip joints may become mechanically defective. At this stage the joint(s) may be painful and cause lameness. In extreme cases the dog may find movement very difficult and may suffer considerably. The British Veterinary Association publish a very good information leaflet:

It was in the light of this knowledge that the British Veterinary Association (BVA) and the Kennel Club (KC) developed a scheme some 40 years ago to assess the degree of hip deformity of dogs using radiography. Your Veterinary surgeon takes an x-ray of your dog’s hips in a particular position which is then examined by a panel of experts. All radiographs submitted to the BVA/KC Hip Dysplasia Scheme are ‘scored’. The hip score is the sum of the points accrued for each of nine radiographic features in each hip joint. The lower the score the less the degree of HD present. The minimum (best) score for each hip is zero and the maximum (worst) is 53, giving a range for the total score of 0 to 106.

Full details of the scheme can be found at the BVA orthe Kennel Club.

In addition, Di Addicott mainains the extremely useful resource of a list of all Hungarian Vizsla Hip Scores:

The Hungarian Vizsla Club Code of Best Practice requires Vizsla owners to hip score all their breeding stock. The current breed average can be found here.

As at the 1st November, the breed average for the Hungarian Vizsla was 12.

Epilepsy

Along with other breeds vizslas may suffer from seizures/epilepsy. Dr Claire Rusbridge at Fitzpatricks Referrals provides this great information

Here is a video

Epilepsy is thought to be genetic with a complicated mode of inheritance. As part of a research project into a number of inheritable diseases the Animal Health Trust are currently asking owners to supply DNA samples from their epilepsy affected dogs in the hope that these might help to establish the genetics pattern of the disease. Cheek swab kits are available from Bryan McLaughlin at the AHT. The process is very simple and the only cost involved is postage back to the AHT. This project is completely anonymous – and you can read more about it here
Please also inform our breed health coordinator if your dog suffers from seizures/epilepsy

Vizsla health

Over the years the Hungarian Vizsla has been considered to be a healthy breed. Responsible breeders adhere to a code of conduct which requires that they breed only from individuals that are of good temperament, physically sound, health tested and free from known hereditary diseases.
Historically this approach has seemed to work well and most vizslas live a long, strong, happy and healthy life. Recently though there is evidence to suggest that there may be some health issues in which the vizsla is over represented – and the HVC is keen to monitor these.
The Kennel Club recently contacted health coordinators in all breeds to establish what each thought were their principal concerns. The HVC responded that in the UK vizsla these were believed to be

1.Cancers  – especially haemangiosarcoma (common) and lymphoma
2. Epilepsy and Seizures
3. Autoimmune/Immune Mediated illness – to date at least 16 conditions have been documented in the UK vizsla..  Those most frequently encountered are Atopy/Allergies, Polymyositis, Sebaceous Adenitis and Steroid Responsive Meningitis/Arteritis. Also Immune Mediated Haemolytic Anaemia and Thrombocytopaenia are being frequently reported
4. Hip Dysplasia
5. Glaucoma – more cases are being reported (already schedule B)

To enhance understanding of existing and emerging problems all vizsla owners are asked to complete the breed health survey. It is vital for the future wellbeing of the Hungarian Vizsla that breeders and owners are honest and forthcoming about any problems that they have experienced.
In addition –here in the UK – there are currently three research areas in which we are seeking owner participation:

1. Epilepsy
2. Polymyositis
3. Immune mediated illnesses

Please follow the menu links to find out more.
The HVC health co-ordinator is Sue Millson:
Telephone: 01892 834178
or contact by email

Vizsla Bobblehead

£9.00

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Bobblehead

The perfect way to keep your specs handy!

HVC Gundog training

If you are new to working your dog, or fancy trying your hand at training for gundog work, then you may find Margo’s Blog an interesting and useful read.

HVC GUNDOG TRAINING

GENERAL HPR TRAINING DAY WITH ALLAN HENDER

Sunday, 14 June 2015 

9.30 for 10am start

To be held at: West Berkshire (M4 Junction 12) exact location to follow.

Limited places available with preference given to Club Members

This general training day is aimed at all levels of HPR breeds. Come along and see if you enjoy it or work on problems that you have.

Entry Fee: Members £25.00 Non Members £30.00

For Entry Form please email Gill….gill@warmhouseservices.com

Entries to: Mrs Gill Parrott 113 Broomstickhall Road, Waltham Abbey, Essex EN9 1LP

accompanied by a cheque made payable to “Hungarian Vizsla Club”.

  • No bitches in season.
  • Dogs are to be kept on leads at all times except when working.
  • Harsh handling will not be tolerated.
  • Please clear up after your dog.

Neither the Hungarian Vizsla Club nor the landowners accept responsibility for injury, loss or damage to persons or property or dogs however occasioned at this event.

Please bring refreshments

 

 


Training Day – Sunday 27th April 2014

GUNDOG TRAINING DAY WITH ALLAN HENDER
Sunday, 27th April 2014
9.30 for 10am start
To be held at: West Berkshire Gundog Training Ground, Moor Copse Nature Reserve, Theale, Berkshire, RG8 8HE (Junction 12 off M4)
Limited places available with preference given to Club Members
This Gundog training day is aimed at all levels of HPR breeds. Come along and see if you enjoy it or work on problems that you have.
Entry Fee: Members £25.00 Non Members £30.00

Entry Form: Word Document; pdf


 


Training Day – 2nd June 2013

at the Drummond Estate, Enderby, Leicestershire by kind permission of
Mr Fred Drummond and his gamekeeper Brian Griffiths

The weather had been kind to us – no rain, some sunshine and a light breeze ideal for hunting. We had 9 dogs attending (5 Vizslas, 3 Weimaraners, 1 Cocker Spaniel) and started the day at 10am with some basic obedience training. We worked our way up until all dogs present where shot over.

We also had some spectators and a family attending who are waiting for their Vizsla puppy to be born.

Everybody enjoyed their day and came away feeling a lot more positive about what they can achieve with their dogs. They were all presented with a Certificate, Rosette and HVC trolley token keyring.

Unfortunately we were not able to hold a raffle on the day but I wanted to give a special mention to Susan Northwood who very kindly sent a cheque for £15.00 towards raffle prizes. Susan attended the first training days we held in 2011. She learnt so much on these days and has entered many working tests with her Hookside Gabor (Rudi) since.


Shot Over Day 21st January 2012

Following on from the successful training days held in March and April 2011, the Draycott family (owners of the Tooley Park shoot) offered the ground for a shot over day towards the end of the season. This took place on 21st January and was attended by 6 novice dogs and handlers. I was generously assisted by Penny Simpson and the guns on the day were Peter & Andrew Draycott, Mark Hill who owns the adjoining farm who also made ground available to us on the day and Nick Hart who handles the financial side of the shoot.

We began the day with a walk through a cover crop of mustard; each dog was run individually to assess obedience and steadiness in an area where we did not expect to find too many birds. We then took a long walk via hedgerows and ditches to one of the larger spinnies where all the dogs were run as a beating line, several birds were shot and retrieved. After lunch we boarded the shoot bus to Mark Hill’s farm and worked the dogs through maize and a spinney. At the end of the day all had at least 2 retrieves ad everyone had been given an insight into working their dogs on live game under gun fire and hopefully now have the confidence to join a shoot local to themselves and enjoy and fulfil their dog’s abilities.

I am also grateful for the assistance on the day of Jim Novis and Simone who brought 2 experienced Vizsla bitches in case any wounded birds proved too difficult for the novices, in the event they were not really needed.


HVC Training Days – 27 March & 9 April 2011

The HVC recently held 2 training days for novice handlers as an introduction into working their Vizslas on a shoot, working test or field trial. 12 Vizslas and their handlers attended either one or both days and hopefully all have learnt something and more importantly enjoyed the days.

Both days were held on Tooley Park Shoot in Leicestershire and a special thanks should be given to the owners, the Draycott family, for allowing us free range over the shoot and the use of the shoot’s lunch hut for refreshments.

The trainers were Penny Simpson, well known in Vizsla circles, Geoff Thompson, a very experienced handler and respected in GSP circles and Derek Whitfield, Acting HVC Field Trial Secretary.

The weather on both days has been extremely kind to us, especially on the 2nd day when we had glorious sunshine all day.

We started both days with a demonstration by Geoff Thompson and his 10 months old GSP, Max. All those present were astounded by his ability to stop at distance on the whistle and his prowess on retrieving both seen and blind dummies.

After this we were split into 3 groups with Penny teaching hunting, Geoff teaching retrieving and Derek teaching basic obedience and also explaining the working of the shoot and how we beat with our dogs through woodland. Some handlers were treated to a visit to one of the laying pens holding some of the more exotic pheasants.

The trainers felt that all of the dogs had some degree of ability and felt they could all progress and be a credit to their owners so hopefully this will just be a start to their working careers.

Also thanks to Queenie Whitfield for providing some delicious cup cakes.

A total of £435.00 has been raised for the Polymyositis Fund.

Training day

Field trials

Field Trials

Field Trials have developed to test the working ability of Gundogs in competitive conditions. Trials resemble, as closely as possible, a day’s shooting in the field and dogs are expected to work with all manner of game, from rabbits and hares, to partridges and pheasants. For the Breeds which hunt, point and retrieve (HPR’s), the trials are designed to test the ability of the dogs to quarter the ground systematically in search of quarry, to point game, to flush on command, to be steady to flush, shot and fall, and to retrieve tenderly to hand on command from both land and water.

Gundog Working Tests

The first sort of competition most people enter will be a Gundog Working Test. These competitions are for members of the organising club only, and are designed to test good, sound, gundog work and encourage dogs’ natural working ability, but do not involve shooting live game. Work instead is done with dummies, and these friendly competitions are a natural extension of the training you will already be doing with your dog. It is difficult, however, to assess pointing through artificial tests and there are limitations to how this can be done in a Gundog Working Test.

The Hungarian Vizsla Club organises both field trials and gundog working tests and details can be found on these pages.

Results of GWT  held on 25th May 2015

Puppy judged by Penny Simpson

1st – Suzie Burton’s Weimaraner Trubon Grafyte Treve

2nd – Mark Jones’s HV Ismeya Saint Beatrix (also highest placed Vizsla)

3rd – Nicky Hamlin’s GSP Know No Bounds At Nuash
4th – Andy Wyatt’s HV Ismeya Saint Isaac
5th – Tim Parrett’s Korthals Griffon Cornwells Starkrimson Red

Novice Dog/ Novice Handler judged by Margo Robertson
1st – Suzanna Mills’ HV Karrouki Windrush D’Lyla (also highest placed Vizsla)
2nd – Arwyn Beddoe’s HV Prettypoint Filip
3rd – Sonia Hammond’s GSP Seasham Super Trouper JW
4th – Verity Griffiths’ HV Ulurdawn Cardinal Marker
5th – Trevor Robinson’s Weimaraner Weipowa Hot Bird

Novice judged by Sue Hender
1st – Libby Mellor’s GSP Kenxiam Comanche
2nd – Harriet Lampart’s GSP Aytree Jessie Jay
3rd – Sarah Holt’s GSP Jack Hill Lad
4th – Julie Jones’ GSP Stubblemere Tergeo
5th – Jennifer Hurley’s GSP Swifthouse Hambledon
Highest placed Vizsla went to Nick Stewart and Tossner Neoma

Open judged by Allan Hender
1st – David Burden’s GSP Deepthatch New Moon
2nd – Mark Jones’ HV Vizelleven Ocean Zanta (also highest placed Vizsla)
3rd – Tim Parrett’s Korthals Griffon Fechlindream Grigio
4th – Louise Holmes’ GSP Ladyhawke Perdita
5th – Emma Carter’s GSP Warrendown Flash of Atilla

If you are new to working your dog, or fancy trying your hand at training for gundog work, then you may find Margo’s Blog(on these pages) an interesting and useful read. Our Secretary is currently training her young bitch, Tara, having had no prior experience of training a gundog for field work. She will be writing regular updates as training progresses, with all the trials and tribulations she encounters along the way.

Judging list criteria

Application form for inclusion in the HVC judges list

CRITERIA FOR INCLUSION ON JUDGES LIST

PROVISOS

  • A condition of an applicant’s inclusion in the Club’s list of Judges is that the applicant agrees to write a critique on their judging of the Breed and submits it to the canine press within the required time limit.
  • It is expected that an applicant’s completed judging appointments will have covered a wide geographical spread.
  • The lists are only valid for a specific period and on expiry the Club will publish updated lists.
  • The Hungarian Vizsla Club Judges Sub-Committee alone shall decide which names will be included in the lists and although proposed judges may fulfil the required criteria, this does not guarantee automatic inclusion in any of the Club’s lists.

A1 List

Judges who have previously been approved by the Kennel Club to award Challenge Certificates in the Breed, have completed their first appointment and have the support of the Hungarian Vizsla Club.

A2 List

Judges who fulfil all the criteria of the ‘A3’ List and who have been assessed in accordance with the Kennel Club requirements and accepted by the Kennel Club for inclusion on an ‘A’ List and have the support of the Hungarian Vizsla Club.

A3 List (Breed Specialist)

Judges recommended by the Hungarian Vizsla Club as being suitable to award Challenge Certificates in the Breed, but who are not yet approved by the Kennel Club.

Requirements:

  • 10 years active involvement with the Breed.
  • Show Hungarian Vizslas regularly.
  • Minimum seven years judging experience in the Breed and 125 Vizslas to have been judged ‘hands on’, to include either a breed open show or a Championship Show without CCs. For the purposes of the Club lists, at a championship show without CCs on offer for the Breed a minimum number of 35 dogs hands on must have been judged.
  • Stewarded at 12 shows.
  • Attended a Breed specific seminar run in accordance with the Kennel Club Code of Best Practice and passed an examination or assessment where applicable.
  • Attended a Seminar on Kennel Club Regulations and Procedure given by a Kennel Club Accredited Trainer and passed the relevant examination.
  • Attended a Seminar on Conformation and Movement given by a Kennel Club Accredited Trainer and received a Certificate of Attendance.
  • Attended a Conformation and Movement “Hands-on Assessment” conducted by a Kennel Club Accredited Trainer and passed the assessment.
  • All judges awarding CCs for the first time in any gundog breed must have attended a Kennel Club Field Trial at an Open stakes level or an open Gundog Working Test for the relevant subgroup prior to their being considered to award CCs
  • Have bred and/or owned a minimum of 3 dogs when they obtained their first entry in the Kennel Club Stud Book (Save in exceptional circumstances).

 

A3 List (Non Breed Specialist)

Judges recommended by the Hungarian Vizsla Club as being suitable to award Challenge Certificates in the Breed, but who are not yet approved by the Kennel Club.

Requirements:

  • Judged a Breed Show or a Championship Show without Challenge Certificates, overall judging experience to include a minimum of 150 Hungarian Vizslas ‘hands on’. For the purposes of the Club lists, at a championship show without CCs on offer for the Breed a minimum number of 35 dogs hands on must have been judged.
  • Judged for a minimum of seven years (five in this breed).
  • Attended a Breed specific seminar, run in accordance with the relevant Kennel Club Code of Best Practice and passed an examination or assessment where applicable.
  • All judges awarding CCs for the first time in any gundog breed must have attended a Kennel Club Field Trial at an Open stakes level or an open Gundog Working Test for the relevant subgroup prior to their being considered to award CCs.
  • Award Challenge Certificates in at least one other breed.

A3 List (Overseas Judges)

Judges must be approved to award Challenge Certificates or their equivalent in the Gundog group in their native country, have demonstrated an involvement in the breed and have the support of the Hungarian Vizsla Club.

B List (Breed Specialist)

Judges recommended by the Hungarian Vizsla Club to Judge at Open Shows or Championship Shows without Challenge Certificates.

Requirements:

  • Five years active involvement in the Breed.
  • Three years minimum judging experience and to have judged 35 Hungarian Vizslas ‘hands-on’.
  • Attended one Breed specific seminar run in accordance with the relevant Kennel Club Code of Best Practice and passed an examination or assessment where applicable.
  • Stewarded at six shows over three years or be passed to award Challenge Certificates in another breed.

 

B List (Non Breed Specialist)

Judges recommended by the Hungarian Vizsla Club to judge at Open Shows or Championship Shows without Challenge Certificates.

Requirements:

  • Demonstrated an interest in the sub group known as the Hunt, Point, Retrieve breeds.
  • Judged 50 Hungarian Vizslas ‘hands on’ over a minimum three year period.
  • Attended one Breed specific seminar run in accordance with the relevant Kennel Club Code of Best Practice and passed an examination or assessment where applicable.
  • Stewarded at six shows over a three year period or be passed to award Challenge Certificates in another breed.

 

B List (Overseas Judges)

Judges must have demonstrated an active involvement with the breed or other Hunt, Point, Retrieve breeds, be approved to judge Hungarian Vizslas in their own country and have the support of the Hungarian Vizsla Club.

C List (Breed Specialists)

For aspirant judges who have shown an interest in the breed and have the support of the Hungarian Vizsla Club.

C List (Non Breed Specialists)

For aspirant Judges who have shown an interest in the breed and have the support of the Hungarian Vizsla Club.

A copy of the current Hungarian Vizsla club Judges list is available for Download in pdf format

Our Shows

The Hungarian Vizsla Club holds 2 shows per year. Our next shows are:

  • Championship Show: Sunday 4th October 2015 (Judge: Mrs Gill Barwick (Bequerelle)

Schedules are circulated to all Club members and are also available from the Show Secretary, or can be downloaded from the website when available.

Our Open Shows are sponsored by Royal Canin

Puppies available

Please Note: All litters published on the Hungarian Vizsla Club website have been bred by members of the Club who have declared to the Club that the litter has been bred within Rule 9 of the Club’s rules and the Kennel Club Code of Ethics attached to the Club Rules.

The Hungarian Vizsla Club recommend that any prospective purchaser of a puppy reads the Club Rules and the KC Code of Ethics and ensure that they have been followed. If you have not met a Vizsla and wonder whether they would be a suitable dog for you and your family before you commit yourself to visit any litter of puppies, please contact any committee member who will be able to arrange for you to visit an experienced Vizsla owner in your area to give you the opportunity to get acquainted with a Vizsla first hand and who will be able to answer any questions you may have about the Breed.

Please also check out our list of approved breeders  – some may be planning litters in the near future.
The Hungarian Vizsla Club does not endorse or recommend any particular breeder.

For member wishing to advertise their forthcoming or current litters here a Puppy Advert Request Form can be downloaded either as a word document for completing electronically, or in pdf format for printing.
This service is free for members, although a donation to Welfare is always appreciated.

Completed application forms should be sent by email to the Club Secretary or posted to
Mrs Margo Robertson,
25 Rickards Close,
Surbiton KT6 6RN.
Tel: 020 8399 8837.

litter details 
area: West Sussex
breeder:Miss Joanne Sampson
email: russetvalley@gmail.com
tel: +44 7896 623954
dam: Russetvalley Renn's Miracle
hipscore: 12
eyes: Gonioscopy Clear
sire: Ulurudawn Cardinal Markerhipscore: 10
Gonioscopy Clear

puppies available 3 6 August 2017
details: 1 dog 2 bitchesdocked: No
dewclaws removed: Yes
microchipped: Yes
pedigree endorsed: Yes
litter details 
area: Kidderminster Worcestershire
breeder:Spencer Digbyemail: info@spencersigns.com
tel:
mobile: 07973 493202
dam: Alsziv Indianahipscore:5/3=8
elbows:
sire: Russetmantle Garcia at Alszivhipscore:6/2=8
elbows:
puppies available:date of birth 10/04/2016
:0 dogs
:1 bitches
details:docked:Yes
dewclaws
removed:yes

microchipped:yes
pedigree endorsed:yes
litter details 
area: Lincolnshire
breeder: Miss Vicky Martinemail:recuerdo@aol.com dam: DT CH VDH,NL CH Recuerdo Roomour JW NJK FSG'14 ESG'15hipscore: 6/8
elbows: 0
Glaucoma Tested Clear
sire: ShCh Hun Ch Quaulity of Skyrockethipscore:
elbows:
puppies available: Dogs 3
Bitches 5
date of birth: 04.06.16
dogs:5
bitches:4
details:docked: Yes
dewclaws removed: yes
microchipped: yes
pedigree endorsed: yes
litter details 
area: Lincs
breeder:
Mrs Sharon Bergin
email: roughshoot.vizsla@btinternet.com
tel: 01754 811323
mob:
dam:Hubertus Hungaricum Allegra of Roughshoot
hipscore: 3/4
sire: Roughshoot Ishmael
hipscore: 7/8


puppies available:3date of birth:01/03/2017
dogs:2
bitches:1
details:docked: No
dewclaws removed: yes
microchipped: Yes
pedigree endorsed: yes
litter details 
area: Kent
breeder: Rubina Da Silva & Laura Sextonemail: Rubina.Dasilva@yahoo.co.uk
tel: 07966441994 or 07843619807
dam: Ertekes Lucky in Lovehipscore:3/4 = 7




sire: Summerpoint Carlhipscore: 7/7 =14
Eyes Clear
DNA Profiled
Long hair gene free
puppies available:Expected
date of birth: 12/12/2017

details:Docked: No
dewclaws removed:Yes
pedigree endorsed:Yes
litter details 
area: Herefordshire
breeder:Mrs Emma Jenkinsemail: emma_jenkins@hotmail.com
tel: +44 1568 613164
mob:
dam:Alsziv Rizzini at Yackerboonhipscore:7:7
Elbows: 0:0
Eyes:Clear
sire: Ch Hookside Gaborhipscore:2:2
elbows:0:0
Gonioscopy:0
Cerebellar Ataxia:clear




puppies available:date of birth: Expected 3 April 2018

details:docked:Yes
dewclaws removed:Yes
microchipped:Yes

 

Approved breeders

HUNGARIAN VIZSLA CLUB APPROVED BREEDER REGISTER

This scheme, which is run and administered by the Hungarian Vizsla Club, aims to identify those breeders who have demonstrated their commitment to the breeding of Hungarian Vizsla by agreeing to comply with criteria for breeding which aim to ensure the highest possible standards of health and welfare for the dogs and puppies concerned. For the purposes of this scheme Stud dog owners can be regarded as a breeder. Requirements to stay on the scheme will be reviewed annually to take account of any future health issues or health tests that are deemed necessary.

Members will:

  • Hold membership of the Hungarian Vizsla Club
  • Comply with Club rules regarding the age, number of litters and health testing of all breeding stock
  • Permanently identify all breeding stock with microchip and aim to have DNA profiling regarding parenting within 1 year of joining
  • Register stock with the Kennel Club and provide the KC registration document at time of handover of puppy
  • Socialise puppies before leaving dam and provide puppy pack detailing feeding, continuing training and exercising
  • Ensure puppy is properly wormed and advise as to future worming and immunisation
  • Provide contract of sale, endorse puppies’ registration documents with Kennel Club endorsements R and X regarding future breeding both in this country and abroad and explain this procedure to new owner
  • Be available for help and advice to new puppy owner and return/rehoming of puppy should this prove necessary
  • Comply with any and all statutory legislation in respect of the owning, keeping and breeding of dogs.

Any approved breeder must not advertise that they have the status if at any time, for whatever reason, they are removed from the list.

Please note – the list is in ALPHABETICAL ORDER.

Download an application form.

Approved Breeder Register Rules.

Notes on KC endorsements.

Download the HVC Puppy Pack.

Completed application forms should be returned to the Club Secretary:

Mrs Margo Robertson

25 Rickards Close,

Surbiton,

Surrey.

KT6 6RN.

Breeder Name
Affix
Dogs/Bitches
Region
Contact Details
Mrs G Barwick
Bequerelle
Both
Northants

Tel: 01933 396201  email:bryanbarwick@yahoo.co.uk

Ms J Bailiff & Mr J Connolly
Hampshire
Tel: 07879 814556email:julietbailiff@googlemail.com
Mrs S Bergin
Roughshoot
Both
Skegness
Tel: 01754 811323 email:roughshoot.vizsla@btinternet.com
Mrs P Connolly
Paaviz
Both
Bedford
Tel: 01234 772155email:paconnolly@virgin.net
Mrs L Cruickshank
Topaeris
Bucks
Tel: 01494 871559 email:lynda.cruickshank1@btinternet.com
Mr & Mrs M Fisher
Zalindor
Both
West Sussex
Tel: 01403 711958 or 07973 152837
Mr & Mrs P Joyce
Ranchstar
Bitches
Cambs
Tel: 01353 624443
Ms C Kelly
Risley
Both
Co Donegal, Eire
Tel: 0035374 9134218 email:risleycloughroe@yahoo.co.uk
Mr & Mrs O Knight
Szolnoki
Both
Morayshire
Tel: 01343 843770email:
Mr & Mrs A McDonald
Northey
Dog
Essex
Tel:01621 740920email:
Mrs S Millson
Lutra
Kent
Tel:01892 834178 email:sue@lutra.me.uk
Mrs T Payne
Szeprubin
Both
Surrey
Tel:01342 842890email: stuartpayne1@hotmail.com
Mrs M Proctor
Bitches
Aberdeenshire
Tel: 01651 872053 email:mhairikproctor@yahoo.co.uk
Ms J Sampson
Russetvalley
Sussex
Tel:01444 480305email: russetvalley@gmail.com
Mrs B Smith
Zavis
Bitches
Kent
Tel: 01303 275364email:betty.zavis@gmail.com
Mr & Mrs D Whitfield
Alfizsbet
Bitches
Leicestershire

Tel: 01455 846108email:whitfieldvizslas@aol.com

Mr L Wightman
Hunterseye
Berwickshire
Tel: 07852 672687 email:lindsay@jlwightman.plus.com
Mr & Mrs Woodcock
Glengamna
Herts
Tel: 01707 646068email:jane@family-woodcock.com

Managing your Vizsla

You can rely upon your relationship with this special breed to give you enormous stimulation and satisfaction. Indeed, at times, you will be challenged and frustrated equally yet, overall, you will be rewarded in immeasurable degree. If you have ‘got it right’ both your lives will be enriched and enlivened as you learn to understand and respect each other. Fortunately, few owners get it wrong but, sadly, some do! So, it is up to you to make sure you are not one of them. At the first sign of any difficulty, contact your breeder for advice. And then, having received it, follow it

Dog Training Classes can be found all over the country and will train you in the management of your Vizsla. Attendance at dog training, after innoculation, will also ‘socialise’ your puppy and ensure it learns to enjoy the company of other dogs and people, under your control.

If you intend showing your puppy, you will also wish to attend Ringcraft classes, where you will learn the rudiments of handling your Vizsla in the show ring. For both Ringcraft and Dog Training, do remember, that practice may not promise perfection but it will go along towards it.

Caring for your Vizsla

Your Vizsla is no different from any small creature, be it animal or human – it needs food, warmth and love; the latter includes discipline. Never confuse discipline with chastisement: discipline is about learning and training, whereas chastisment is about punishment. If you get the training right, your Vizsla will learn to fit in with your life and you will never need to chastise it. Simple commands will suffice, preferably of one word and syllable – eg SIT, DROP, DOWN, NO! LEAVE, STAY etc., followed by ‘Good dog!’ or ‘Well done!’ and a titbit as a reward. As with children, canine discipline requires a calm attitude and consistency of approach. The main focus should always be positive and reward the good behaviour.

Coat – a very attractive aspect, not only for its beautiful ‘Russet Gold’ colouring but also because, being short-coated, it is relatively easy to keep clean compared with some other breeds. When your Vizsla’s wet, a quick towel down will leave him almost dry whereas, if he’s muddy, somewhere warm and comfortable to lay – perhaps on newspaper – will see most of the mud drop off when it’s dry. To keep his coat gleaming, a brush down daily with a ‘velvet’ grooming glove will work wonders. In the spring he will start to shed his winter coat – often a lighter colour – to reveal the lovely rich colour coat he wears in the summer, when a daily brush with a horse (or human) brush will help the metamorphosis.

Claws – need clipping on a regular basis. It is easier to learn to do it yourself as vets do not always take off enough. The old adage about claws being worn down by walking on pavements etc doesn’t always work. The Vizsla should have thick fleshy pads: this means his claws can grow too long if they have to touch the ground in order to be worn down. So, continue the nail clipping that your pup’s breeder should have started, on a weekly basis, so that he becomes used to the routine and will sit quietly as you do it. If he struggles, you may cut too short and make the claw bleed. This is painful and will lead to the pup refusing to let you clip his claws again. Be firm and kind and reward good behaviour.

Lead training – The final part of the early learning process is lead training. This should be done in the garden while his vaccinations are taking effect. Make sure you never drag your Vizsla by the lead. Remember that all training must be a positive and happy experience so, if he digs his heels in and refuses to move, don’t forget the food! A piece of cheese will work wonders! EARS – they should be sweet-smelling and clean in appearance. Usually they are. A wipe with tissues is usually enough to keep them clean and a cotton bud may be used very gently on the inside of the outer ear flaps. However, NEVER insert a cotton bud down into the ear for fear of perforation of the drum. Your dog will jerk his head quite vigorously if you attempt to do this, perhaps with catastrophic consequences so, NEVER EVER DO IT! At any sign of a discharge or unpleasant odour, make an appointment to see your vet.

Teeth – chewing on raw marrow bones will keep them sparkling. There are also many biscuits brands on the market, designed with canine dentition in mind. Do remember, however, these have a calorific value and an abundance of any ‘food’ will inevitably lead to an increase in weight over time. Many propriety brands of tooth-paste are available and most dogs will permit their owners to brush their teeth clean, particularly if you make it a pleasant experience.9) Will clean up after their dogs in public places or anywhere their dogs are being exhibited.

Buying your Vizsla

BUYING YOUR VIZSLA

There are many points to ponder when making this decision. After you have researched the various breeds, considered your lifestyle and finally decided you DO want a Vizsla, the next question is:

From whom do you buy your puppy?

The Hungarian Vizsla Club has a page which list puppies available from Club Members to interested people. You select one or some, make contact and are then considered by the breeder(s) for suitability to have one of their puppies. If you are, you go on their list.
Do be careful not to buy from a breeder just because you like the look of his/her web-site! Having the ability to construct an attractive web-site is not positively correlated to being a good and reputable breeder. Some breeders use their dogs as a business!
First, ask the breeder if s/he complies with the Club Code of Practice. The Club regularly publishes in its Newsletter a list of all the litters that have been registered with the Kennel Club. The list includes details of the hip scores (or their absence!) plus the ages of the dam (mother dog) and sire (father dog). Hip scores are important because they show the breeder is working to prevent hip dysplasia. It is not a big problem in the breed and the Club wants to ensure it stays that way. Therefore, reputable breeders have their breeding dogs X-rayed to prevent problems with hips in the puppies’ future. Hip-scoring is NOT a guarantee because that is not possible with nature. However, breeders who have hip-scores for their Vizslas have done their level best to guard against the possibility.
The age of the parent dogs is very important. Sadly, some breeders use very young bitches, far too young to be mothers and the Club works hard to educate as many people as possible to avoid such practices. Members do this because they care for their Vizslas and want to promote the best practice possible.

NEVER BUY FROM A NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENT OR PET SHOP – good breeders have a waiting list for their puppies.
Check the following:
1.
Is the litter registered?
2. Does the breeder have an affix (a kennel name that identifies the breeder)?
3. Is the colour of the Vizsla properly recorded? The Breed Standard colour is ‘Russet Gold’. If the breeder calls it any other name then, clearly. the breeder is not familiar with the Breed Standard and this should sound a warning note to you.
4.
Will you get a Puppy Pack that details feeding, care, vaccination, worming and also promises to maintain contact with you indefinitely?
5.
Does the purchase contract insist that the puppy is returned to them in the event of something going wrong? Beware of a breeder who does not insist that the puppy is returned to the kennel if you cannot keep it!
6.
Is the price reasonable? Some breeders are charging exorbitant prices for their puppies. Do remember a high price does not guarantee you have purchased the next Crufts champion! Unfortunately, the Club cannot regulate prices but the Club will only recommend breeders whose first concern is the well-being of the breed.

The Club has compiled a list of questions you should ask the breeder of your puppy – if you are not satisfied with any of the answers to your questions then you should seek further advice or go elsewhere.

Download the HVC Puppy Pack with lots of good advice from experienced Vizsla owners.

Brief history of the Vizsla

Brief history of the Vizsla

A full and impressive history of the breed can be found in Gay Gottlieb’s definitive work, ‘The Hungarian Vizsla’ (ISBN 0-947647-09-0) from where the following information was obtained.

Some research suggests the origins of this breed lie in the ninth century, some suggests the eleventh, whilst other points to a later time. In her seminal book on the Hungarian Vizsla, Gay Gottlieb includes a museum picture of a Gothic panel from the fifteenth century: it shows a dog that is believed to be a Vizsla.

The one thing we can rely upon, about which there can be little doubt, is that the Vizsla has a very long history. She explains how the breed has changed its appearance somewhat over the centuries, to the lovely animal we now delight in. In its early days, the breed was bred with the The Yellow Turkish dogs and latterly many other breeds are thought to have been in its bloodlines. Gay Gottlieb refers to Setters, Bloodhounds, the German Vortsthund, the Balkan Beagle, the ancient Foxhound, the Pammion Hound and the Romanian Copie, as well as the Greyhound and the Sloughi. Little wonder, then, that it carries such a variety of instincts and characteristics, all making it such a versatile breed and adaptable companion for many different types of owner.

During the early part of the twentieth century, the Hungarian Empire experienced many difficulties from hostile countries intent on stealing its land and taking over its rule. During this time, the Vizsla also experienced difficulties and lovers of the breed determined to save it from the possibility of extinction. They formed a club in 1924 that resulted in individual dogs being registered for the first time in its history. However, things got even worse for the Vizsla after the disintegration of the Hungarian Empire, particularly during the second World War and the Russian Occupation. Fortunately, some emigrés to Europe and further afield smuggled their Vizslas with them and the breed thus became established outside Hungary.

Today, the Vizsla can be found all over the world with good specimens of the breed regularly exported and imported between breeders.

THE BREED IN BRITAIN

It is believed two Vizslas were imported into the UK before the second World War in 1939. However, the first registration of imported Vizslas was recorded by the Kennel Club in 1953. Thereafter, between 1953 and 1955, there were three matings from this pair – resulting in 13 puppies – with some being exported to America.

Over the years, there were other imports and by the mid 1960s some 300 Vizslas were known to be in the UK. Despite the growth in its numbers, Vizslas were still classified as a rare breed and it was not until 1971 that the Hungarian Vizsla breed was awarded challenge certificate status for the first time.

Since then, a glance at the Show Results will demonstrate how the breed has gone from strength to strength in the ring. It has also gained recognition in the Field and many other areas of activity.

Versatility of the breed

Vizslas display their versatility in a variety of different disciplines:

  • Field Trials – working to the gun with birds
  • Working Trials – tracking, using scent but no guns
  • Show Ring – achieving Show Championship Certificates
  • Agility – using challenging exercises and speed
  • Obedience – usually via a dog training school
  • Flyball – relay racing in a team
  • Freestyle – Heelwork to music
  • PAT (Pets as Therapy) Dogs – visiting hospitals, schools & suchlike

Regardless of the category in which they are used, all Vizslas should first and foremost be dearly loved family pets, as well as being respected participants in their chosen activity.

CLUBS & SOCIETIES

There are two clubs/societies dedicated to the Hungarian Vizsla: The Hungarian Vizsla Club and The Hungarian Vizsla Society. Both have as their purpose the welfare of the breed and promote good practice for owners.

HVC Open Show 2014

Results of the HVC Open Show held on 16th March 2014

BIS

Best in Show:White’s Parcroft Piros by Arunszvar
Reserve Best in Show:Connolly’s Bitcon Celebrity

 

bpis

Best Puppy in Show:Da Silva’s Bournehouse Crispin
Reserve Best Puppy in Show: Rutherford & Westall’s Kincsem Enna Llatsew
Congratulations to all the winners!

All the results can be found here

 

BSAVA Award

bsava-logo

Anna Tauro (Neurology Resident) has recieved a prestigious  for the Clinical Research Abstract she presented last year. Anna was up against over 100 vets and won the award with her research work on Vizla Polymyositis. – See more at: http://www.fitzpatrickreferrals.co.uk/news/prestigious-bsava-prize-anna
Anna Tauro is Resident in Neurology at Fitzpatrick Referrals and – along with Clare Rusbridge – is the vet with whom Di Addicott is collaborating on the Polymyositis research. The BSAVA award for the best clinical research abstract is very competitive and hugely prestigious, and the vizsla community must be very grateful to Anna for all of the hard work that she has put in to her retrospective cohort study of 70 affected vizslas. Hopefully too the credentials of the other authors of the study will lay to rest the concerns of those in the breed that continue to question the integrity of the ongoing PM research.

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